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Community Garden Plots Available, Sign up for Home& Gardening Classes Now!

NORTH FORK’S FIRST COMMUNITY GARDEN CELEBRATES 5TH ANNIVERSARY; 

Full schedule of home & garden workshops

kicks off the 2013 growing season

With Spring right around the corner, Hallockville Museum Farm is pleased to announce the re-opening of the first community garden on the North Fork for the season. Hallockville’s Community Garden is celebrating its fifth anniversary this year by offering different sized plots as well as an expanded range of home and garden workshops and classes open to the general public. All of these programs reflect the mission of the museum farm and enable community members to re-connect with their agricultural roots. 

Jim Romansky, Hallockville Board member and coordinator for the Community Garden says, “Growing your own vegetables and being able to reap the fruits of your labor is a dream for many people, but not everyone has the land to do this.” The community garden is a great resource for people who live in apartments, condos, or who just want to share their love of gardening in a group setting. “The garden is yet another example of Hallockville’s commitment to preserving the farming heritage of the East End,” adds Romansky. Applications are now available for both 20-foot by 20-foot and 10-foot by 20-foot plots in the Hallockville Community Garden.

 

Romansky will also lead the Community Garden Opening Day Work party on Saturday April 6th. New and returning gardeners will be joined by volunteers from Avalon Park & Preserve's "Students Taking Action for Tomorrow's Environment" (STATE) group. Activities will include weeding, mulching and cleaning up Hurricane Sandy-damaged trees that impacted the garden. Volunteers are welcome! Call 631-298-5292 if you'd like to lend a hand!

 

Beginning Saturday, March 30, Mark Vosbugh, HMF Board Member and Cornell Cooperative Extension Certified Master Food Preserver, will present the first in a four-part series of classes on food preservation for the home cook, including canning, freezing and drying, and making jams and jellies. Mark’s easy-to-follow methods will equip gardeners with the techniques needed to preserve their excess crops, sealing in flavor and freshness to enjoy later in the winter months. “Preservation methods like canning locks in flavor at the vegetable’s peak of ripeness,” says Vosburgh. “Plus it’s truly local- you know exactly where the food comes from- either your own garden or one of the area farms.”

 

On Sunday, June 2, Hallockville will welcome Stephanie Gaylor of Invincible Summer Farms to a class about Seed-Saving, how the individual gardener can do it, and why it’s important for sustaining the region’s local food supply.

 

More information on the garden, registration forms, and complete event schedule can be found at: 

Hallockville.com    

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